Nov 26

Low-income people and families can face eviction notices, problems with social security benefits, bankruptcy and more without the resources to get legal help. The Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee has been tackling these issues by providing free civil legal services for Milwaukee’s low-income population for over 100 years. In a large room at the United Community Center (UCC) on Milwaukee’s south side, every Wednesday, lawyers and law student volunteers meet with dozens of people from the surrounding community

Source: Milwaukee’s Legal Aid Society Takes On Neighborhood Lawyering | WUWM

Nov 22

“Finally, the evidence is fairly clear that residence restrictions are not effective,” the report noted. “In fact, the research suggests that residence restrictions may actually increase offender risk by undermining offender stability and the ability of the offender to obtain housing, work, and family support. There is nothing to suggest this policy should be used at this time.” Jill Levenson, a Barry University professor of sociology who conducted a similar study the same year, reached virtually the same

Source: Miami uproots sex offender camp, reviving debate about harsh law | Miami Herald

Nov 20

In addition to the new bureau, Warren proposes a national right-to-council fund that would provide legal representation for renters facing eviction or other issues, a cause championed by other Democratic candidates as well. The plan would also establish a federal just cause eviction standard and a right to lease renewal, and create a national small dollar grant program that prevents families from being evicted because of financial emergencies.

Source: Elizabeth Warren housing plan updated to focus on renters – Curbed

Nov 18

Single-family zoning not only segregates people by race and class, but also artificially increases prices and hurts the environment. By outlawing the construction of duplexes, triplexes, and other multifamily units, single-family zoning artificially constrains the housing supply, driving up prices by government fiat. “When you have demand that is sky-high, and you don’t have the supply to keep up with it, prices rise. Rents rise,” noted Minneapolis’s mayor, Jacob Frey.

Source: How Minneapolis Defeated NIMBYism – The Atlantic

Nov 16

The Washington State Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously upheld a Seattle law requiring landlords to accept the first qualified rental applicant, reversing a lower court ruling and delivering a win for the city’s lawmakers. The law, known as the First in Time (FIT) law and initially approved in 2016, is believed to be the only one of its kind in the country. It dictates that landlords must review applications in the order their applications are received and accept the first qualified prospective tenant.

Source: WA Supreme Court approves Seattle law requiring landlords to accept first qualified applicant | Crosscut

Nov 07

How did we get here? Simply put, bad government—from outdated zoning laws to a 40-year-old tax provision that benefits long-time homeowners at the expense of everyone else—has created a severe shortage of houses. While decades in the making, California’s slow-moving disaster has reached a critical point for state officials, businesses and the millions who are straining to live there.

Source: California’s Affordable Housing Crisis: Why Prices Are So High and How to Solve It

Nov 04

Apple’s commitment includes $1 billion in affordable housing investments, $1 billion in mortgage assistance for first-time homebuyers, and $300 million worth of Apple land opened up to affordable housing projects.

Source: Apple Commits $2.5 Billion to Fight California Housing Crisis – MacRumors

Nov 03

Buyers must commit to renovating the property within three years of the purchase and pay a 5,000 euro ($4,300) deposit, which will be returned once the work is complete. They will also need to present a clear refurbishment proposal for the property in question.

Source: Italian town of Cammarata offers free houses to lure new residents | CNN Travel

Oct 09

It’s a disturbing twist to the phenomenon I’ve dubbed the Great Reset. A large and growing component of the shift, or reset, from homeownership to rental housing is made up of single-family homes that were once owned but are now rented. The NBER study estimates that the 4 percent decline in America’s homeownership rate, from 67 percent before the crash in 2007 to 63 percent in 2014, means that roughly 1.5 million American households have shifted from owners to renters.

Source: The Decline in Owner-Occupied Single-Family Homes – CityLab

Oct 02

I still live there—partly because rents in Oakland have surged more than 50% in less than a decade, and in a neighborhood where a typical one-bedroom now goes for more than $2,800, I can’t afford to move. I recognize the value of this type of tiny house, called an accessory dwelling unit or ADU, in theory. In built-up cities with little extra land and residents who fight development, adding tiny cottages in backyards is one way to help address the housing shortage. The small size saves energy and curbs my s

Source: Tiny houses are marketed as a housing solution, but I hate mine

preload preload preload